Windows Azure

A 11-post collection

Exposing your data using .NET WCF Data Services: Part 4

In the previous posts in the series Exposing your data using .NET WCF Data Services we’ve covered everything required from building a data driven application from scratch to making the application ready to be fully running in the cloud. The final step in this process is to publish/host the application on Windows Azure. Below are the steps required to do so. Creating the Windows Azure cloud service The first thing that needs to be done is that we create the service to host our application. To do this I’ve chosen the Cloud Service option and specified the required parameters as shown below. Once the service has been successfully created the Windows Azure Portal dashboard will show the...

Exposing your data using .NET WCF Data Services: Part 3

In the previous posts Exposing your data using .NET WCF Data Services: Part 1 and Exposing your data using .NET WCF Data Services- Part 2 I wrote about creating a WCF Data Services application to expose data from a SQL Database and publishing the database to SQL Azure. In this post we’ll go through migrating the WCF Data Service code created in Part 1 into a Windows Azure service so that we can ready the code for publishing to the cloud. Downloading the latest Windows Azure SDK The first step in migrating our code is to grab and install the latest Windows Azure SDK as shown below. At the time of writing this post the latest version is version...

Migrating this blog to Windows Azure Websites

So I’ve been wanting to use the new Windows Azure portal for a while now and with all the new features currently available one good way to do so was to try creating a website on Windows Azure. Of course the best candidate for this task was moving my blog from my current web host over to the Windows Azure cloud. Below are the steps I had to go through to perform this migration. I have broken them down to the 3 sections below. 1) Creating the website 2) Creating the FTP credentials 3) Migrating/Updating Data 4) Configuring custom DNS As you can see below, once you log in to the new portal there are many different options....

A lap around the new Windows Azure Portal - Part 4

In Part 3 of the Windows Azure Portal Series I covered the Database tab of the new Windows Azure Portal. This post will cover the next tab in the series. Service Bus, Access Control & Caching Creating a service Namespace Viewing Access Control & Service Bus URLs & end-points Viewing Access Keys As you can see here from the screenshots above the portal has a very consistent interface layout across all its tabs and it’s much easier to use than the old one. I was going to write up some detail in this post on how you can get started with the Azure Service Bus but before I got started i came across this Get Started with the Azure...

Windows Azure VM Role: Links

I was hoping to write a blog post covering the details of setting up a Windows Azure VM role by going through all the steps my self and taking screenshots …etc as I’ve done in my previous Windows Azure post. In order to do so however I need to have a spare workstation which I can deploy Windows Server 2008 R2 on so that I can go with the process but unfortunately I do not have one handy and on my primary PC I’ve got Virtual-PC installed but that can’t handle installing Windows Server as a guest OS . So rather than writing the tutorial myself I thought I’d just point you to a good one I’...

Migrating a SQL database to SQL Azure

Happy New Year 2011 to you all. Continuing on with my previous posts on Windows Azure I thought I?d write up a post covering migrating a SQL Server database from a local SQL Server and into the cloud. The conversion of a SQL Server database into SQL Azure for publishing in the cloud can be done by the SQL Azure Migration Wizard which you can find on CodePlex. For the purpose of this post I have decided to try and Migrate the AdventureWorks sample database into SQL Azure format. Once you?ve installed the AdventureWorks databases from the link above when you logon to your local instance of SQL Server you should see the following databases listed. Now your...

A lap around the new Windows Azure Portal - Part 3

In Part 2 of the Windows Azure Portal Series I covered the The Hosted Services, Storage Accounts & CDN tab of the new Windows Azure Portal. This post will cover the next tab in the series. Database As the name suggests, this tab allows you to create and manage Windows Azure cloud databases. The following screenshots show the different components of the tab. To start with the first few screenshots show how you would have managed databases in the old portal followed by screenshots from the new portal to illustrate the differences. After all a picture is worth 1000 words so I thought this will be the best way to show you the differences. The Old Portal Viewing of existing...

A lap around the new Windows Azure Portal - Part 2

In Part 1 of this series I covered the Home tab of the new Windows Azure Portal. This post will continue on from where we started and will be covering the following tab Hosted Services, Storage Accounts & CDN Deployment Health As you can see below the Deployment health menu provides a general view of your application deployments and their statuses. This tab allows you create an manage the application side of your Windows Azure application including the number of instances, deployment type such as Staging or Production ?etc. Using the menu bar at the top of the screen you can very easily create new hosted services and storage accounts. When you click the New Hosted Service button you will...

A lap around the new Windows Azure Portal - Part 1

You may have heard that at PDC 2010 along with the many announcements, the new Windows Azure Portal was announced. As you’ll see it say when you log on into the Windows Azure Portal (the old one) the new Windows Azure Portal has a ‘substantially enhanced user experience‘. It?s really hard not to agree I think! When you logon to the old portal you will see the following screen with the message above shown on top.  Once you click on the link to go to the new portal the following screen will show after the Silverlight application has loaded. There are significant user interface changes in the new portal. One of the big differences between the new &...

Beginners Guide: Hosting a Silverlight application on Windows Azure

I was wondering how easy it might be to build a Silverlight application and have it host in on Windows Azure and it turned out to be much simpler than I thought! The steps below will demonstrate everything from creating a Silverlight application all the way to having it live hosted on Windows Azure. It’s easy? Step 1: Create a new Azure Application in Visual Studio 2010 To begin we’ll start off by creating a new ‘Windows Azure Cloud Service’ in Visual Studio 2010 by selecting the ‘Cloud’ option under the Visual C# section as shown below, for the purpose of this project the solution will be named TimeServe. Step 2: Create a new ASP.NET Web Role...